July 7, 2017

Experiments in wet cyanotype, part 3

Wet cyanotype, Sue Reno, Image 27
Emboldened by some success with experiments so far (see part 1 and part 2), I got slightly obsessive about making more prints.
Wet cyanotype, Sue Reno, Image 28
The pre-treated cotton muslin was fun to play with, but realistically I was unlikely to use it in a quilt, which is the ultimate goal here, so I put that aside and worked with just my preferred cotton sateen that I had treated with the cyanotype chemicals. The sateen soaks up a lot of product, so there was a lot to react with the moisture during the long exposures.
Wet cyanotype, Sue Reno, Image 29
I also started working a bit larger, using 9 x 12 inch panels and some 16 x 20. For round three I used plume poppy, Japanese anemone, and wood poppy leaves. I also used a bit more moisture, lightly spraying the foam board before laying the fabric on, and spraying again before topping with the glass. I continued to use dilute red dye-na-flow in the first spray, but I'm not certain it made as much of an impact on the sateen as it did on the muslin.
Wet cyanotype, Sue Reno, Image 30
I am still not entirely used to these long exposures. My old normal was 10 - 15 minutes, so 24 hours is a long time to wait! I did have the fun of hovering over them and checking them frequently.
Wet cyanotype, Sue Reno, Image 31
Here's the unrinsed prints after about 24 hours.
Wet cyanotype, Sue Reno, Image 32
They are dark and lovely and mysterious.
Wet cyanotype, Sue Reno, Image 33
It's sort of a shame they can't stay this way, but I have the images to enjoy.
Wet cyanotype, Sue Reno, Image 34

Wet cyanotype, Sue Reno, Image 35
And voila! Here are the finished images. Once again, I was surprised and amazed.
Wet cyanotype, Sue Reno, Image 36

Wet cyanotype, Sue Reno, Image 37

Wet cyanotype, Sue Reno, Image 38
I felt like I was starting to suss out a good working method. The images are still unpredictable, but falling into a sort of pattern.
Wet cyanotype, Sue Reno, Image 39
Time to make more and more!

2 comments:

Regina Sweet said...

I see in your notes that you are spraying Dyna a Flo on the pieces. So that is where you are getting some of the color from? I have Dyna flo in about 10 colors.

Sue Reno said...

I think 98% of the color is coming from the chemical reactions in the wet cyanotype process. The dilute dyenaflow *might* be adding a hint of pink. It's worthy of more experimentation--if you try it, report back!